Statue of Nike of Samothraki

Replica of Nike of Samothraki

The original Statue is a marble Hellenistic sculpture of Nike (the Greek goddess of victory), that was created in about the 2nd century BC. Nike of Samothraki is one of the most celebrated sculptures in the world.

Currently available one statue

Height with the base:  3.00m

 

Statue of Poseidon

Replica of Archaic statue (human size) which exude energy and power along with serene beauty and intense realism.

A marble statue of Poseidon from the 2nd century BC shows the god holding a trident. Originally from the island of Melos, the statue is now in the National Archaeological Museum, in Athens, Greece.

Currently available one statue

Height with the base:  2.40m

 

Statue of Aphrodite of Milos

Replica of Archaic statue (human size) which exude energy and power along with serene beauty and intense realism.

The Aphrodite of Milos, commonly known as the Venus de Milo, is a beautiful marble statue now exhibited in the Louvre, Paris. Nothing is known of its sculptor. Experts date it between 200 and 100 BC.

Currently available one statue

Height with the base:  2.40m

 

Statue of Kouros

Replicas of Archaic statue (human size) which exude energy and power along with serene beauty and intense realism.

The Kroisos Kouros is a marble kouros (statue of a young man) from the area of Anavysson in Attica (Greece) which functioned as a grave marker for a fallen young warrior named Kroîsos. The free-standing sculpture strides forward with the “archaic smile” playing slightly on his face. The sculpture is dated to c. 540–515 BC and stands 1.95 meters high. It is now situated in the National Archaeological Museum of Athens (inv. no. 3851).

Currently available two statues

Height with the base:  2.40m

 

Theatre Masks

Replicas of theatre masks which exude energy and power along with serene beauty and intense realism.

The Ancient Greek term for a mask is prosopon (lit., “face”), and was a significant element in the worship of Dionysus  in Athens, likely used in ceremonial rites and celebrations. Most of the evidence comes from only a few vase paintings of the 5th century BC.  No physical evidence remains available to us, as the masks were made of organic materials and not considered permanent objects, ultimately being dedicated at the altar of Dionysus after performances. Nevertheless, the mask is known to have been used since the time of Aeschylus and considered to be one of the iconic conventions of classical Greek theatre.

Currently available: four masks

Height:  1.30m

 

 

Altar

Replica of an ancient Greek altar which can be used for award ceremonies, lighting of the flame ceremonies, stage deco.

Currently available one altar

Height with the base:  1.20m x 0.50m x 0.50 m

 

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